Recovering from Tropical Storm Irene in Vermont

Rotary members helped a father and son in Vermont return to their home following Tropical Storm Irene. Photo by Jon Gilbert Fox, Rotary Club of Hanover, New Hampshire

Rotary members helped a father and son in Vermont return to their home following Tropical Storm Irene. Photo by Jon Gilbert Fox, Rotary Club of Hanover, New Hampshire

By Marilyn Bedell, Rotary Club of Lebanon-Riverside, New Hampshire, USA, and Jan McElroy, Rotary Club of Henniker, New Hampshire

Rotary members in the New England region of the United States are providing long-term recovery from Tropical Storm Irene, with the help of Rotarians around the globe. Here’s one story of the difference we are making.

Irene, a large and destructive tropical cyclone, affected much of the Caribbean and East Coast of the United States during late August 2011. In Vermont, Irene flooded most of the state’s rivers and streams and in many places stripped away the earth itself, leaving fields of stone and boulders where lush crops and gardens once stood. Hundreds of homes and businesses were destroyed and thousands badly damaged. Continue reading

Lighting up Rotary, now and then

140509_walkerBy Jill Baldwin Walker, 2014-15 governor of District 6060 (Missouri, USA)

At the age of 13, I attended my first Rotary International Convention, in Dallas, Texas. I remember walking through the halls of the event fascinated by the clothing worn by some of the women — women of Africa in their head wraps and ornate dresses and women from India in beautiful wraps of silk. Continue reading

Rotaract members in East Africa unite in service

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By Sarah Maingi, Rotaract representative from Kenya

On a warm Saturday morning in April, about 100 Rotaractors from Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi gathered at a community in Buterere in Bujumbura, Burundi, to provide households with clean drinking water.

Some of the Rotaractors, myself included, had traveled over 1,000 kilometers by road, and all sacrificed their Easter holidays to serve. Continue reading

Peace Corps, Rotary bound by service

140505_Hessler_RadeletBy Carrie Hessler-Radelet, acting director of the Peace Corps

I come from a family of Rotarians. My father is a Rotarian, and my Aunt Ginny — whose Peace Corps service inspired me to become a volunteer — was also a Rotarian. Peace Corps volunteers and Rotarians like my father and aunt are bound by a common purpose: service. That’s why I’m excited about Peace Corps’ partnership with Rotary International and to see what we can accomplish together. Continue reading

Your chance to serve at the Sydney Convention

Rotary will be attempting to set two records during the BridgeClimb at the Sydney convention.

Rotary will be attempting to set two records during the BridgeClimb at the Sydney convention.

By Mark Maloney, chair of the Sydney Convention Committee and a member of the Rotary Club of Decatur, Alabama, USA

We’ve put a lot of effort this year into giving you a chance to serve alongside fellow Rotary members from around the globe during the 2014 Rotary International Convention in Sydney 1-4 June. I’m excited to share some of those opportunities with you, and looking forward to seeing how members get engaged by actively getting involved.

Labyrinth for Literacy
You can begin your service experience by donating one or more new children’s Continue reading

Rotary Youth Exchange shaped my life

Denise DiNoto

Denise DiNoto

By Denise DiNoto, Rotary Club of Colonie-Guilderland, New York, USA

In August 1990, I left my hometown in rural upstate New York, for a year as an exchange student to Tasmania, Australia. The experience helped shape my adult life, as it has for many other exchange students. However, my situation was unique because I was one of the first students with a mobility impairment to participate in Rotary Youth Exchange.

Continue reading

What kind of a doctor are you?

Don Messer with students from Stanton Elementary School in Washington, D.C.

Don Messer with students from Stanton Elementary School in Washington, D.C.

By Divya Wodon and Naina Wodon, Interact Club of Washington International School, and Quentin Wodon, Rotary Club of Washington, D.C.,USA

How come you know so much? What kind of a doctor are you? The child who asked this question to (Dr.) Don Messer is from the Stanton Elementary School in Washington, D.C. The school is located in Anacostia, one of the poorest parts of the city. Until recently, few children passed the mathematics and reading tests, but things have improved, in part because of a tutoring program run by Don. Continue reading

Rotary Peace Centers build a better future

Rhett Sangster

Rhett Sangster

Chris Offer, Rotary Club of Ladner, Canada

I recently visited the spring conference at Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center, one of six worldwide. As a supporter of the Rotary peace centers program, I had an opportunity to see firsthand how our support is being used.

Rhett Sangster, a Saskatchewan nominated for the program from my Rotary district in Ottawa, was one of twelve graduating peace fellows delivering a presentation that day. His unique and innovative explanation of the ongoing treaty negotiations with Canada’s Aboriginal peoples, known as First Nations, changed my ideas and perceptions about the process. Continue reading

World Malaria Day

Tomorrow is World Malaria Day, which celebrates the progress being made to combat malaria. As part of our commitment to fighting disease, Rotary members are on the front lines of the effort to reduce sickness and death from the mosquito-spread illness. Learn more by following the links below:

 

Rotaractors deliver free health care in Uganda

A member of Rotaract weighs a baby before vaccinating the child against polio.

A member of Rotaract weighs a baby before vaccinating the child against polio.

By Chelsea Ducharme, Rotaract Club of Kasese, Uganda

On 22 February, we packed up our trucks with supplies and traveled 45 minutes to Kyempara, a parish in Kasese District, southwestern Uganda, near the Congolese border.

Kyempara has only one government health center, with one head nurse serving a population of more than 6,000 people. With limited resources, the center is unable to keep up with all the community’s health needs. Our small but mighty Rotaract Club heard their call for help and took action to support our neighbors. Continue reading